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State's delegates say Cruz faction ignored by GOP

Jul 20, 2016 By Mead Gruver, The Associated Press

CHEYENNE (AP) -- Wyoming delegates to the Republican National Convention in Cleveland said Tuesday they're not necessarily for or against nominating Donald Trump, they just want their voices heard.

Delegates are peeved about how a vote happened Monday. The proposal to change party rules failed on a voice vote, helping clear the way for Trump's nomination.

Several states, including Wyoming's delegates, wanted the measure decided by roll call. The decision by party leaders to push through the measure without the political theater of a roll-call vote angered delegates including Wyoming's Jeff Hymas.

"We're fine being heard, and being able to vote, and saying we lost, now we'll sit down. We're totally fine with that. But instead they just ignored us," Hymas said. "We need to know that we were heard."

Delegate Jared Olsen also called squelching the roll-call vote a bad decision.

"It's an interesting process that, months ago, Donald Trump spent a lot of energy and his supporters spent a lot of time on the airways talking about how the RNC was so against him, and thwarting all his efforts," said Olsen. "What I have seen since Monday is a relationship between the RNC and Donald Trump like we've never seen before."

Hymas and Olsen are among 23 Wyoming delegates pledged for Texas Sen. Ted Cruz. Wyoming has a total of 29 national delegates including one for Trump and one for Florida Sen. Marco Rubio.

Wyoming delegates were less concerned that portions of a speech Trump's wife, Melania, gave to the convention were identical to Michelle Obama's speech at the 2008 Democratic convention.

Melania Trump presented herself well and looked "very first-lady-like," so the Trump campaign's apparent problem with plagiarizing is difficult to understand, said Olsen.

"They seem to be getting more and more organized and more and more professional. It perplexes me there wasn't more fact-checking," Olsen said.

Olsen doubted the event would hurt Trump's prospects in the election: "It's a bump in the road," he said

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2017-10-22