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Goats, steers shown at Fremont County Fair
Eighteen-year-old Jessica Pingetzer with her steer, Jimmy, smiled as the two took champion honors for 4H senior beef showmanship at the Fremont County Fair. Later Thursday afternoon, Pingetzer was awarded the champion ribbon for FFA senior showmanship. Photo by Wayne Nicholls

Goat exhibitor pockets prize after prize

Aug 3, 2012 - By Emily Etheredge, Staff Writer

The announcer for the youth goat show seemed to be stuck on repeat Thursday at the 2012 Fremont County Fair. Calling out Colter Lenier, 12, nine times as a ribbon winner for each category of goats being shown, the Pavilion boy filled up his back pocket with prize ribbons to take home.

"I came to the fair to have fun with my animals," Lenier said. "It isn't about the ribbons for me."

Lenier brought eight goats, several chickens and 15 rabbits to show at the fair, noting he had people helping him show his rabbits while he participated in the goat show.

"My family had to step in and help me out because the goat and rabbit shows were scheduled to be at the same time," Lenier said.

Out of all the animals Lenier owns, he said his goats are his favorite largely because of their sweet nature.

"My goats respect me, and I think they are the sweetest animals," Lenier said. "A couple of times some of them have acted up, but I have never been scared of them."

Lenier said part of the responsibility of owning goats is the chores involved.

"I usually go to school, come back home, and take care of my animals," Lenier said. "It usually takes me about two hours to finish all of my chores."

Scott Pruett, the judge for the goat division, told Lenier several times that his goats needed to be meatier.

"Goats are like any other red meat," Pruett said. "They are just pounds on the scale."

Lenier said his goats could have had more weight to them, but he struggled locating hay several times throughout the year.

"I will know for next year," Lenier said. "My goats could definitely eat a little more."

Rabbits

Kayla Rae Lawrence, 17, had the hairiest hare at the youth rabbit show Thursday.

She kept busy meticulously brushing her lionhead rabbit, Jitterbug, to make the hair smooth.

"I think I have brushed him all morning," Lawrence said. "Since he has a lot of fur I wanted him to look nice for the judges."

Although many brought rabbits to participate in the rabbit show, Jitterbug gained popularity from people passing by his cage because of the unusual amount of fur covering him.

"There have been so many people who have stopped and wanted to take pictures of him," Lawrence said. "His cute factor is definitely appealing to a lot of people."

Lawrence purchased the rabbit several months ago from a pet store in Cheyenne.

"I thought it would be fun to bring him to the fair and show him," Lawrence said. "It turns out he has become quite popular."

Lionhead rabbits have a long wool main around the head resembling a male lion and typically weigh no more than two or three pounds.

Lawrence and Jitterbug won first place in the senior showmanship category, and camera flashes treated the small rabbit like a celebrity.

"It has been fun to see his popularity," Lawrence said.

Jessica Makin, 15, of Riverton, brought her silver fox, rex cross rabbit, Lucky, to show at the fair.

Makin said the rabbit got sick when he was born, and she had to bring him into her house to nurse him back to health.

"Lucky would come in my room, and we would watch movies together," Makin said. "I actually gave him a tiny bit of children's cold medicine, and he immediately started to feel better."

Makin brought 15 chickens, two peacocks and five rabbits to show at the fair.

"Coming to the fair is something I really look forward to because I get to show off my animals that I love a whole lot," Makin said.

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