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New exhibit showcases special needs participants

Aug 3, 2012 - By Emily Etheredge, Staff Writer

There is a new exhibit at the Fremont County Fair this year dedicated to those with special needs.

Debra Williams, of Riverton, said the exhibit was created to allow for people with special needs to be able to participate in the fair.

"Having the exhibit is wonderful because it allows anyone the opportunity to enter something," Williams said. "It makes those with special needs connected to the community where they develop a stronger sense of purpose."

Some of the items displayed in the exhibit include pastel paintings, drawings and a quilt.

Williams said Jacob Holcomb wanted to make a quilt for his bed, and she said she would help him construct one.

"I told him if he wanted to make a quilt, I would teach him how," Williams said. "We spent four months cutting square after square of fabric, and it was tedious at times. He was determined to finish the quilt, and now he has a finished product that he could bring to show at the fair."

Williams has a son with special needs and often spends her time volunteering at Community Entry Services where she teaches arts and crafts classes.

"This exhibit is so important to those with special needs," Williams said. "Having the ability to create something and know they are equals with other people showing things is really important."

Flowers

Marigolds, tiger lilies, zinnias and sunflowers were some of the 200 flower entries brightening the exhibit hall Thursday at the open flower show for the Fremont County Fair.

Flower show judge Donna Cuin drove from Casper to judge the flowers submitted from residents in Fremont County.

Cuin said some of the factors involved in her judging include uniformity, no insect bites and freshness.

"I know weather has been really dry in the area this year so I am taking into consideration that it was harder to grow flowers this year," Cuin said. "If some of the flower entries look perfect, it will tell me that the person growing them knew what they were doing in the dry conditions."

Cuin said some of her favorite types of flowers are traditional flowers that older exhibitors will bring in that have been favorite family flowers for generations.

"Lilacs, bleeding hearts and amaranths are flowers that we are starting to see lost to the current generation," Cuin said. "Sometimes when you pass an old homestead you will see lilacs flourishing because they can survive without water and you know this was a flower left from a family who would have enjoyed them at one time."

-- Emily Etheredge

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