Menu


UW researcher uses neutering in managing coyote population

Oct 16, 2013 From staff reports

Marjorie MacGregor wants to manage coyotes through better chemistry.

For the past four years, MacGregor, a University of Wyoming doctoral candidate in ...


There is more! Read the rest of the story - subscribe today!

From left, Marjorie MacGregor, a University of Wyoming doctoral candidate in zoology and physiology; Elsey Perkins, a UW graduate student; and Liz Flaherty, a former UW faculty member, work with a coyote at a UW facility off campus in this 2012 photo. MacGregor heads a research project to control coyote populations through chemical neutering. Photo by Bethany Melton

From left, Marjorie MacGregor, a University of Wyoming doctoral candidate in zoology and physiology; Elsey Perkins, a UW graduate student; and Liz Flaherty, a former UW faculty member, work with a coyote at a UW facility off campus in this 2012 photo. MacGregor heads a research project to control coyote populations through chemical neutering. Photo by Bethany Melton


From left, Marjorie MacGregor, a University of Wyoming doctoral candidate in zoology and physiology; Elsey Perkins, a UW graduate student; and Liz Flaherty, a former UW faculty member, work with a coyote at a UW facility off campus in this 2012 photo. MacGregor heads a research project to control coyote populations through chemical neutering. Photo by Bethany Melton

From left, Marjorie MacGregor, a University of Wyoming doctoral candidate in zoology and physiology; Elsey Perkins, a UW graduate student; and Liz Flaherty, a former UW faculty member, work with a coyote at a UW facility off campus in this 2012 photo. MacGregor heads a research project to control coyote populations through chemical neutering. Photo by Bethany Melton

Read The Ranger...
2017-11-17